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BAck To HSR 1206/1207

 

HSR 1206 Syllabus        HSR 1207 Syllabus

 

ILLINOIS VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

Course Syllabus

 

Humanities, Fine Arts and Social Sciences

Division
 
HSR 1206 – Practicum I    

 

                  

Date: Fall, 2005                                             Seminar hours per week: 1

Semester Hours: 4                                        Other hours: 0          

Prerequisite: HSR 1000, HSR 1201,         Semester offered: Fall/Spring

      and HSR 1202 or permission                 Instructor(s): Jean Batson-Turner

      from the Program Coordinator

Lecture hours per week: 0                                      

Lab hours per week: 15

      (15 hours X 15 weeks = total 225 contact hours)

 

 

I.      CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

 

        This course provides a comprehensive community agency experience for skills development and application, career exploration, and individual reflection.  Emphasis will be given to self-understanding as the human services student actively participates in the day-to-day activities of a social service agency.

 

        GENERAL EDUCATION GOALS:

 

        The purpose of general education at IVCC is to enhance students’ abilities to think and act responsibly as citizens in a changing world.  Specific General Education goals that are included in this course are:

 

1.         To apply analytical and problem solving skills to personal, social and professional issues and situations.

2.         To communicate orally and in writing, socially and interpersonally.

5.         To work and study effectively both individually and in collaboration with others.

6.         To understand what it means to act ethically and responsibly as an individual in one’s career and as a member of society.

8.         To appreciate the ongoing value of learning, self-improvement and career planning.

 

II.            EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to….

 

1.            Integrate and apply knowledge, skills, and understanding derived from course content to practice.

2.            Understand the role of human service agencies within the community.

3.            Utilize tools of reflection for career assessment and self-awareness.

4.            Understand the developmental stages of the practicum experience.

 

III.          EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCIES:

 

Outcome #1 – Integrate and apply knowledge, skills, and understanding derived from course content to practice.

Competency 1.1 – Students will be able to identify and utilize a variety of theoretical models for counseling and interviewing clients in one-to-one and group situations.

Competency 1.2 – Students will be able to discuss issues for helping across cultures and demonstrate beginning skills of cultural competence.

Competency 1.3 – Students will be able to model basic helping skills, including empathy, caring concern, and respect, in all professional relationships.

Competency 1.4 – Students will be able to identify the traits of a competent human service worker and apply this understanding to their agency roles.

 

Outcome #2 – Understand the role of human service agencies within the community.

Competency 2.1 – Students will be able to comprehend the mission, services, and organizational structure of their site agency.

Competency 2.2 – Students will be able to understand the agency and its relation to the human services network.

Competency 2.3 – Students will be able to identify the roles of the various agencies within the agency delivery system, particularly the agencies within the referral network of the site agency.

Competency 2.4 – Students will be able to understand contributions of community agencies to social functioning and the community forces that affect the agency.

 

Outcome #3 – Utilize tools of reflection for career assessment and self-awareness.

Competency 3.1 – Students will be able to discuss the meaning and value of reflection in experiential education.

Competency 3.2 – Students will be able to utilize the tool of journal-writing to record learning into four categories: Knowledge, Skills, Personal Growth and Career Development.

Competency 3.3 – Students will be able to evaluate and utilize processing techniques, including the Integrative Processing Model.

Competency 3.4 – Students will be able to participate in reflective dialogue in a seminar setting; the main purposes of the reflective seminar are skill development, support, and feedback.

 

Outcome #4 – Understand the developmental stages of the practicum experience.

Competency 4.1 – Students will be able to understand Stage 1 – Experiencing the “What Ifs”: The Anticipation Stage.  During this stage, students will be able to complete a learning contract with the site supervisor and field instructor, outlining goals of learning for the field experience.

Competency 4.2 – Students will be able to discuss the components of Stage 2 – Taking Stock and Facing Reality: The Disillusionment Stage.  This stage involves three types of assessment:

(a)               taking inventory of where you are now and where you want to be;

(b)               identifying any problem areas that need attention; and

(c)               developing and implementing plans to take action in both of these areas.

Competency 4.3 – Students will be able to understand the pertinent issues of Stage 3 – Breaking Through Barriers: The Confrontation Stage.  During this stage, students will learn techniques for problem-solving and creating change.

Competency 4.4 – Students will be able to evaluate critically issues of worker competence during Stage 4 – Riding High: The Competence Stage.  During this stage students will be able to identify sources of fulfillment, including worthwhile work, responsible relationships, and self-defined success.

Competency 4.5 – Students will be able to identify and discuss issues of Stage 5 – Traveling the Last Mile: The Culmination Stage.  During this stage, students will complete a self-inventory and the tasks of culmination:

(a)               identifying and dealing with unfinished business;

(b)               identifying your feelings and finding a safe place to express them; and

(c)               planning for the future.

 

 

IV.       COURSE CONTENT:

 

Topic 1:          Laying the Groundwork

Topic 2:          Framing the Experience: The Developmental Stages of an Internship

Topic 3:          Understanding Yourself

Topic 4:          Understanding Yourself as an Intern

Topic 5:          Experiencing the “What Ifs”: The Anticipation Stage

Topic 6:          Getting to Know the Clients

Topic 7:          Getting to Know Your Colleagues

Topic 8:          Getting to Know the Placement Site

Topic 9:          Getting to Know the Community

Topic 10:        Taking Stock and Facing Reality: The Disillusionment Stage

Topic 11:        Breaking Through Barriers: The Confrontation Stage

Topic 12:        Riding High: The Competence Stage

Topic 13:        Considering the Issues: Professional, Ethical, and Legal

Topic 14:        Traveling the Last Mile: The Culmination Stage

 

 

V.        INSTRUCTIONAL METHOD:

 

Agency site placement

Group seminar

Small group discussion and exercises

Written assignments and evaluations

 

 

VI.       STUDENT REQUIREMENTS AND METHOD OF EVALUATION:

 

Agency site participation as agreed in learning contract

Group discussions and peer reports

Completion of chapter exercises and assignments

Completion of reflection journal

 

 

VII.      TEXTBOOK:

 

The Successful Internship: Transformation and Empowerment in Experiential Learning. Second Edition.  H. Frederick Sweitzer and Mary A. King. Thomson: Brooks/Cole. 2004.

 

 

ILLINOIS VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

 

Course Syllabus

 

Humanities, Fine Arts and Social Sciences

Division
 
HSR 1207 – Practicum II   

 

                  

Date: Spring, 2006                                        Seminar hours per week: 1

Semester Hours: 4                                        Other hours: 0          

Prerequisite: HSR 1206 and                       Semester offered: Fall/Spring

      permission from the Program                 Instructor(s): Jean Batson-Turner

      Coordinator

Lecture hours per week: 0                                      

Lab hours per week: 20

      (total 225 contact hours)

 

 

I.      CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

 

        For students who have completed HSR 1206: Practicum I, this course provides a continued community agency field experience for advanced skills development and application, continuing career exploration, and individual reflection.  Emphasis will be given to self-understanding as the student actively participates in the day-to-day service activities of a social service agency.

 

        GENERAL EDUCATION GOALS:

 

        The purpose of general education at IVCC is to enhance students’ abilities to think and act responsibly as citizens in a changing world.  Specific General Education goals that are included in this course are:

 

1.         To apply analytical and problem solving skills to personal, social and professional issues and situations.

2.         To communicate orally and in writing, socially and interpersonally.

5.         To work and study effectively both individually and in collaboration with others.

6.         To understand what it means to act ethically and responsibly as an individual in one’s career and as a member of society.

8.         To appreciate the ongoing value of learning, self-improvement and career planning.

II.            EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES

 

Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to….

 

1.            Apply knowledge, skills, and understanding derived from course content.

2.            Develop techniques and skills common to practice in the human services field.

3.            Assess career competencies and personal traits required of human service workers.

4.            Understand the network of human services at both the organizational and community levels.

 

III.          EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCIES:

 

Outcome #1 – Apply knowledge, skills, and understanding derived from course content.

Competency 1.1 – Students will be able to understand health and social welfare systems as they interface with diverse client populations.

Competency 1.2 – Students will be able to demonstrate continued development of knowledge and skills needed for cultural competence.

Competency 1.3 – Students will be able to process field experiences in terms of what theoretical approaches work in particular situations.

Competency 1.4 – Students will be able to demonstrate self-understanding of values and personal strengths and weaknesses.

 

Outcome #2 – Develop techniques and skills common to practice in the human services field.

Competency 2.1 – Students will be able to demonstrate the basic helping skills of care, empathy, and respect in client and staff relationships.

Competency 2.2 – Students will be able to demonstrate beginning counseling and interviewing skills in a variety of situations.

Competency 2.3 – Students will be able to utilize skills of observation, data collection, reporting, and evaluating impressions both in oral and written form.

Competency 2.4 – Students will be able to understand and apply the principles and skills of case management, including interagency coordination and making appropriate referrals for services.

 

Outcome #3 – Assess career competencies and personal traits required of human service workers.

Competency 3.1 – Students will be able to demonstrate continued development of self-assessment skills and processing techniques.

Competency 3.2 – Students will be able to discern the rights and responsibilities of helping professionals and evaluate their goals for pursuing work in the field.

Competency 3.3 – Students will be able to identify traits of competent human service professionals and assess personal strengths for helping.

Outcome #4 – Understand the network of human services at both the organizational and community levels.

Competency 4.1 – Students will be able to evaluate the placement site agency in terms of its history, mission, goals and objectives, cultural norms, and organizational structure.

Competency 4.2 – Students will be able to understand the agency site in terms of human resources, including communication patterns and informal roles.

Competency 4.3 – Students will be able to understand the organization as it relates to the external environment, including other human service agencies, the surrounding community, the economic climate, and the sociopolitical environment.

Competency 4.4 – Students will be able to analyze communities in terms of assets and strengths.

Competency 4.5 – Students will be able to identify and utilize skills of community development.

 

 

IV.       COURSE CONTENT:

 

Topic 1:          Laying the Groundwork

Topic 2:          Framing the Experience: The Developmental Stages of an Internship

Topic 3:          Understanding Yourself

Topic 4:          Understanding Yourself as an Intern

Topic 5:          Experiencing the “What Ifs”: The Anticipation Stage

Topic 6:          Getting to Know the Clients

Topic 7:          Getting to Know Your Colleagues

Topic 8:          Getting to Know the Placement Site

Topic 9:          Getting to Know the Community

Topic 10:        Taking Stock and Facing Reality: The Disillusionment Stage

Topic 11:        Breaking Through Barriers: The Confrontation Stage

Topic 12:        Riding High: The Competence Stage

Topic 13:        Considering the Issues: Professional, Ethical, and Legal

Topic 14:        Traveling the Last Mile: The Culmination Stage

 


 

V.        INSTRUCTIONAL METHOD:

 

Agency site placement

Group seminar

Small group discussion and exercises

Written assignments and evaluations

 

 

VI.       STUDENT REQUIREMENTS AND METHOD OF EVALUATION:

 

Agency site participation as agreed in learning contract

Group discussions and peer reports

Completion of chapter exercises and assignments

Completion of reflection journal

 

 

VII.      TEXTBOOK:

 

The Successful Internship: Transformation and Empowerment in Experiential Learning. Second Edition.  H. Frederick Sweitzer and Mary A. King. Thomson: Brooks/Cole. 2004.