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Documentation

     A writer must cite the source of phrasing, ideas, or information of another writer in written work. Even if one paraphrases or summarizes material from another writer, the source must be acknowledged. Not acknowledging the phrasing, ideas or information of another writer constitutes plagiarism.


Plagiarism and Cheating

The following statement on plagiarism and cheating was adopted by the Humanities and Fine Arts Division:

Plagiarism constitutes the appropriation of another person's exact words or original thoughts or writing without extending proper credit (using in-text citations and a works cited reference list) to the original source. As such, plagiarism exists as an illegal action—a type of theft that, in the business/professional world, for example, could result in severe penalties against you.

The administration and faculty of Illinois Valley Community College prohibit plagiarism, whether the language and the ideas originate from a published source or from work done by another student. Commission of plagiarism and/or cheating may result in failure of the course and/or dismissal from the college.

Simply, plagiarism is not worth the effort; don't do it!

The following demonstrates the difference between plagiarism and a proper use of source material.

 

Plagiarism and Integration

 

Original Passage, from Stephen Bernstein's "Form and Ideology in the Gothic Novel":

Gothic narratives are frequently termed convoluted or labyrinthine, assessments often enough fairly accurate. This tendency arises chiefly from the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism. Further confusion arises through twists and turns of action that allow for the coincidences required for resolution. Gothic narrative is thus usually what Tzvetan Todorov terms a "double narrative," similar to the detective novel, which, he says, "contains not one but two stories: the story of the crime and the story of the investigation."

Student Versions Comments
1.) Gothic narratives are frequently termed convoluted or labyrinthine, assessments often enough fairly accurate. This tendency arises chiefly from the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism. Obvious plagiarism; word-for-word repetition without any acknowledgment of the original source.
2). Gothic narratives are frequently termed convoluted or labyrinthine, assessments often enough fairly accurate. This tendency arises chiefly from the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism (Bernstein 151). Still Plagiarism. The documentation alone does not help. The language is still that of the original author. Only quotation marks around the original passage plus parenthetical documentation would be correct.
3). Gothic narratives are frequently convoluted. This arises mainly because gothic novels are concerned with the revelation and correction of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are revealed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism (Bernstein 151). Still Plagiarism—a few words have been changed or omitted, but by no stretch of the imagination is this student using his or her own language.
4). "Gothic narratives are frequently termed convoluted or labyrinthine, assessments often enough fairly accurate. This tendency arises chiefly from the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism" (Bernstein 151). Not quite plagiarism, but incorrect and inaccurate. Quotation marks should only be used with exact repetition of the original words. This student has changed some of those words and so is not entitled to use quotation marks.
5). "Gothic narratives are frequently termed convoluted or labyrinthine, assessments often enough fairly accurate. This tendency arises chiefly from the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism" (Bernstein 151). Not plagiarism but still not quite correct. The quotation marks acknowledge the words of the original writer, and the parenthetical documentation gives specific information about the source, but the student still has not properly integrated the quotation into his or her own writing. Quotations are like helium-filled balloons; they need an introduction in the student writer's own words to prevent them from flying out of the paper.
6). During the history of the Gothic tradition, many critics have noticed that its narratives are often confusing and difficult to follow. As Stephen Bernstein explains, this confusion is a direct result of "the concern gothic novels have with the revelation and setting right of hidden wrongs from the past, and the slow way in which these wrongs are exposed over time through coincidence and a providential fatalism" (151). Correct. The student uses his or her own words to summarize part of the original passage and uses quotation marks to enclose the phrases that come directly from the original. The parenthetical documentation shows readers that the expressed ideas are those of the original writer and not the student's. Proper integration/introduction of borrowed critical opinion is included.
7). Bernstein explains that gothic narratives can be confusing because they usually contain characters that, throughout the course of the story, learn disturbing things about their own past and then try to fix those things in the story (151). Correct. The student has paraphrased the original. He or she uses the original writer's name in the sentence to show that the ideas are not those of the student writer, although the student has incorporated those ideas into his or her own writing. The meaning is still the same in student's paper as it is in the original. The parenthetical documentation refers readers directly to the source the student has used, in case they want to verify an accurate representation of the original or study that subject more fully.

 

Introducing Quotations

     As the above examples illustrate, in addition to using parenthetical citations, a writer should introduce quotations into the text of the paper.

Example:

     James Thurber writes, "The dog has got more fun out of Man than Man has got out of the dog, for the clearly demonstrable reason that Man is the more laughable of the two animals" (378).

 

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